Letting in the light: designing your building for light optimization

By Gabrielle

 

Architecture can be a wonderful tool. Your architect can help you save money and create an environmentally-friendly building simply by designing your home to maximise on natural light.

More of us are looking for sustainable solutions to apply to our offices, retail buildings, schools and homes. Lighting is possibly the most important component of sustainable architectural design, and today’s article will offer you a few key tips to achieve maximum natural lighting potential.

Good glazing

There’s a simple rule we follow when it comes to designing a building which will let in the light: more windows = more light. So why aren’t all buildings designed with ample windows?

Wellington house designers usually opt for fewer windows due to the fact that they tend to cancel a lot of the heat circulating within the walls. They also let in an unpleasant amount of heat and glare in the summer. When this happens, you’ll usually turn to electricity to pick up where natural lighting is failing: we’ll amp up the heat pump or draw the blinds and turn on our electric lights.

The best solution for this issue is proper glazing: the kind built to tackle sunlight properly, while ensuring that your home stays snug in the winter and cool in the summer, without that nasty glare. Investing in proper glazing for your Wellington building design is a must.

Luminous layout

This step comes down to prioritising rooms and separating the most-lived-in spaces from the more ‘transitional’ ones. As long as you communicate to your architect which rooms you and your family or staff will be spending the most time living in, we can go ahead and design a floor plan to filter in the light where it’s needed most.

Generally the living room, kitchen and dining are the areas requiring the most light, so we can design these to be bright, open, window-rich and – hopefully – facing the morning sun.

Got any questions about letting more light in your building design? Who better to talk to than your professional Wellington architect? Get in touch with the team at Moore Architecture today!

 

 

Good glazing

There’s a simple rule we follow when it comes to designing a building which will let in the light: more windows = more light. So why aren’t all buildings designed with ample windows? Wellington house designers usually opt for fewer windows due to the fact that they tend to cancel a lot of the heat circulating within the walls. They also let in an unpleasant amount of heat and glare in the summer. When this happens, you’ll usually turn to electricity to pick up where natural lighting is failing: we’ll amp up the heat pump or draw the blinds and turn on our electric lights. The best solution for this issue is proper glazing: the kind built to tackle sunlight properly, while ensuring that your home stays snug in the winter and cool in the summer, without that nasty glare. Investing in proper glazing for your Wellington building design is a must.

Luminous layout

This step comes down to prioritising rooms and separating the most-lived-in spaces from the more ‘transitional’ ones. As long as you communicate to your architect which rooms you and your family or staff will be spending the most time living in, we can go ahead and design a floor plan to filter in the light where it’s needed most. Generally the living room, kitchen and dining are the areas requiring the most light, so we can design these to be bright, open, window-rich and – hopefully – facing the morning sun. Got any questions about letting more light in your building design? Who better to talk to than your professional Wellington architect? Get in touch with the team at Moore Architecture today!    
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